Food safety powers must have teeth

    Press/Media: Expert comment

    Description

    The introduction of a food crime unit, recommended by Professor Chris Elliott in his report, is to be welcomed (Food scandals: protection money, Editorial, 5 September), as is the government’s new found commitment to fighting food crime. Hopefully the government’s aim to shrink the state and encourage self-regulation will not cause the new FCU to flounder. Our recent research demonstrates that food crime in the meat sector is serious and organised, but the supply-chain dynamics mean that the organisers are those who have legitimate access to the markets in order to place adulterated products. These offenders do not conform to our usual stereotypes of organised criminals, as many have a legitimate role in the supply chain/marketplace.

    Period5 Sep 2014

    Media contributions

    1

    Media contributions

    • TitleFood safety powers must have teeth
      Media name/outletThe Guardian
      Media typePrint
      Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
      Date5/09/14
      DescriptionThe introduction of a food crime unit, recommended by Professor Chris Elliott in his report, is to be welcomed (Food scandals: protection money, Editorial, 5 September), as is the government’s new found commitment to fighting food crime. Hopefully the government’s aim to shrink the state and encourage self-regulation will not cause the new FCU to flounder. Our recent research demonstrates that food crime in the meat sector is serious and organised, but the supply-chain dynamics mean that the organisers are those who have legitimate access to the markets in order to place adulterated products. These offenders do not conform to our usual stereotypes of organised criminals, as many have a legitimate role in the supply chain/marketplace.
      URLhttps://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/sep/05/food-safety-powers-must-have-teeth
      PersonsDavid Ellis