NEWSWEEK: Device May Help Drinkers Avoid Alcohol Tainted With Deadly Chemicals

    Press/Media: Research

    Description

    The mysterious death of a 20-year-old American tourist in Mexico brought light to the devastating effects of consuming tainted alcohol. The case was one of many that led the U.S. State Department to caution travelers about the harms of fake booze. The tricky part of telling if your vacation cocktail is contaminated is that it typically tastes no different than untainted versions. For those concerned, there's a device that may be able to detect fake spirits before the bottle is even opened.

    Period21 Sep 2017

    Media coverage

    1

    Media coverage

    • TitleDevice May Help Drinkers Avoid Alcohol Tainted With Deadly Chemicals
      Media name/outletNewsweek
      Media typeWeb
      Country/TerritoryUnited States
      Date21/09/17
      DescriptionThe mysterious death of a 20-year-old American tourist in Mexico brought light to the devastating effects of consuming tainted alcohol. The case was one of many that led the U.S. State Department to caution travelers about the harms of fake booze. The tricky part of telling if your vacation cocktail is contaminated is that it typically tastes no different than untainted versions. For those concerned, there's a device that may be able to detect fake spirits before the bottle is even opened.
      URLwww.newsweek.com/device-may-help-drinkers-avoid-alcohol-tainted-deadly-chemicals-669251
      PersonsDavid Ellis, Royston Goodacre

    Research Beacons, Institutes and Platforms

    • Biotechnology

    Keywords

    • alcohol
    • counterfeit goods
    • alcohol testing