THE CONVERSATION: Rome’s Flaminian Obelisk: an epic journey from divine Egyptian symbol to tourist attraction

Press/Media: Expert comment

Description

It’s a great place to sit in the shade and enjoy a gelato. The base of the Flaminian Obelisk in the Piazza del Popolo on the northern end of Rome’s ancient quarter offers views of the twin churches of Santa Maria dei Miracoli and Santa Maria di Montesanto. But while enjoying the outlook, take a few minutes to marvel at how this 23-metre chunk of granite ended up where it has.

The Flaminian Obelisk was carved at the height of Egypt’s New Kingdom, during the reign of Seti I (1290 to 1279 BCE), the father of Ramesses the Great. “Carved” is a rather clinical expression for an astounding feat of engineering. Quarrying and moving a 263-ton chunk of granite – with the additional issue of not having access to any metal harder than bronze – is no mean feat.

Period3 May 2018

Media coverage

1

Media coverage

  • TitleRome’s Flaminian Obelisk: an epic journey from divine Egyptian symbol to tourist attraction
    Media name/outletThe Conversation
    Media typeWeb
    Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
    Date3/05/18
    DescriptionIt’s a great place to sit in the shade and enjoy a gelato. The base of the Flaminian Obelisk in the Piazza del Popolo on the northern end of Rome’s ancient quarter offers views of the twin churches of Santa Maria dei Miracoli and Santa Maria di Montesanto. But while enjoying the outlook, take a few minutes to marvel at how this 23-metre chunk of granite ended up where it has.

    The Flaminian Obelisk was carved at the height of Egypt’s New Kingdom, during the reign of Seti I (1290 to 1279 BCE), the father of Ramesses the Great. “Carved” is a rather clinical expression for an astounding feat of engineering. Quarrying and moving a 263-ton chunk of granite – with the additional issue of not having access to any metal harder than bronze – is no mean feat.
    URLhttps://theconversation.com/romes-flaminian-obelisk-an-epic-journey-from-divine-egyptian-symbol-to-tourist-attraction-95968
    PersonsNicky Nielsen

Keywords

  • Egyptology
  • ancient Rome
  • archaeology