THE GUARDIAN: ‘I didn’t see how I could ever get back to a normal life’: how burnout broke Britain – and how it can recover

Press/Media: Expert comment

Period11 Oct 2022

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • Title‘I didn’t see how I could ever get back to a normal life’: how burnout broke Britain – and how it can recover
    Media name/outletThe Guardian
    Media typeWeb
    Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
    Date11/10/22
    Description“When pressure exceeds your ability to cope with it, that’s stress and burnout,” says Cary Cooper, professor of organisational psychology at the University of Manchester. “The first sign that you are getting burnt out is your behaviour begins to change. If normally you are fairly affable, you lose your sense of humour, or at meetings, when you are usually engaged, you’re quiet.” Taking a holiday doesn’t help: you still feel jaded when you get back.

    Cooper agrees there is a difference between this kind of burnout and use of the word to describe a broader sense of millennial anxiety. “Being disenchanted is what we’re seeing in that generation. I think they are looking for something different from work.” But that doesn’t make them lazy, he adds – it may be that watching their parents’ generation work all hours, only to be cut loose by employers in a downturn, has simply convinced them that slavish loyalty doesn’t pay. “They are prepared to work hard, these kids. It’s not that they want to be protected or just want things their own way,” he says. “They are saying to us that the older generation put up with this, but they won’t.” In the long run, he argues, they are probably doing everyone a favour. “If you consistently work long hours, you will get ill. Anything over 40 hours a week is not good for you.”
    URLhttps://www.theguardian.com/money/2022/oct/11/how-burnout-broke-britain-and-how-it-can-recover
    PersonsCary Cooper

Keywords

  • work
  • mental health