The Matter of the North – Manchester: First City of the Industrial Revolution

Press/Media: Expert comment

Description

Melvyn Bragg celebrates the achievements of Manchester, the original northern powerhouse. Its emblem is the bee, a symbol of work, cooperation and industry. It was from here that huge scientific, social and commercial changes would sweep the globe. Melvyn visits Quarry Bank Mill in Styal outside Manchester which is one of the best preserved textile mills in the country.
Melvyn visits the house of the novelist Elizabeth Gaskell, who chronicled the rapidly changing lives of the people who lived in or near Manchester, or Cottonopolis as it was known. Melvyn hears how a culture of dissent or non-conformity fed into the city's spirit of invention. He discusses the great scientists that came out of the city - James Joule the father of thermodynamics and John Dalton the father of atomic theory. Melvyn also hears about one of the country's biggest and now largely forgotten art exhibitions which was held in Manchester - The Art Treasures exhibition of 1857.

 

Contributors
Canon Apiarist Adrian Rhodes, Manchester Cathedral
Professor Hannah Barker, University of Manchester
Dr James Sumner, University of Manchester
Jenny Uglow
Dr Katy Layton-Jones, University of Leicester
Maria Balshaw, The Whitworth Art Gallery

Period6 Sep 2016

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • TitleThe Matter of the North – Manchester: First City of the Industrial Revolution
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletBBC Radio 4
    Media typeRadio
    Duration/Length/Size30 minutes
    Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
    Date6/09/16
    Description

    Melvyn Bragg celebrates the achievements of Manchester, the original northern powerhouse. Its emblem is the bee, a symbol of work, cooperation and industry. It was from here that huge scientific, social and commercial changes would sweep the globe. Melvyn visits Quarry Bank Mill in Styal outside Manchester which is one of the best preserved textile mills in the country.
    Melvyn visits the house of the novelist Elizabeth Gaskell, who chronicled the rapidly changing lives of the people who lived in or near Manchester, or Cottonopolis as it was known. Melvyn hears how a culture of dissent or non-conformity fed into the city's spirit of invention. He discusses the great scientists that came out of the city - James Joule the father of thermodynamics and John Dalton the father of atomic theory. Melvyn also hears about one of the country's biggest and now largely forgotten art exhibitions which was held in Manchester - The Art Treasures exhibition of 1857.

    Contributors
    Canon Apiarist Adrian Rhodes, Manchester Cathedral
    Professor Hannah Barker, University of Manchester
    Dr James Sumner, University of Manchester
    Jenny Uglow
    Dr Katy Layton-Jones, University of Leicester
    Maria Balshaw, The Whitworth Art Gallery
    Producer/AuthorFaith Lawrence
    URLwww.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07synwj
    PersonsJames Sumner