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Personal profile

Teaching

  • Teaching Assistant: ‘Introduction to Metaphysics and Epistemology’ - 1st Year course, semester 2, 2022.

Course involved running seminars and marking essays and exams on basic introductions to classic issues such as acquiring knowledge, and implications of causation.

  • Teaching Assistant: ‘Ethics’ – 2nd year course, semester 2, 2022.

Course involved running seminars and marking essays on key ethical terms that people ordinarily use, like goodness, wrongness, dignity, promises, etc.

  • Teaching Assistant: ‘Introduction to Ethics’ – 1st year course, semester 1, 2021-2022.

Course involved running seminars and marking essays and exams on a general introduction to ethics, but also including some general work on how to study philosophy at university.

  • Teaching Assistant: ‘Critical Thinking’ – 1st year course, semester 1, 2021-2022.
    Course involved running seminars and marking essays and exams on general principles of critical thinking, plus introduction to propositional and predicate logic.
  • Teaching Assistant: ‘Philosophy of Mind’ – 2nd year course, semester 1, 2020-2021.
    Course involved running seminars and marking essays on theoretical and practical issues in the philosophy of mind, including basic introductions to some non-Western philosophy of mind, such as one’s sense of self and the nature of personhood. The course was taught fully online.
  • Teaching Assistant: ‘Ethics’ – 2nd year course, semester 1, 2019-2020.

Course involved running seminars and marking essays on both the practical application of ethics and the theoretical philosophy involving it (e.g. material on normative, practical and metaethics).

  • Teaching Assistant: ‘Critical Thinking’ – 1st year course, semester 1, 2018-2019.

Course involved running seminars and marking essays and exams on general principles of critical thinking (including preparing students for general university academic practice), plus introduction to propositional and predicate logic.

Overview

Biography:

James has recently completed his PhD in the philosophy department at the University of Manchester.

He was a recipient of a bursary from the university and a recipient of the President's Doctoral Award scholarship. His undergraduate degree was in History & Philosophy and his masters was in Philosophy, both at the University of Sheffield.

Research:

James works in the philosophy of psychology. His thesis worked towards establishing how should we understand character trait attribution as it exists in the domain of social cognition.

Supervisors: Dr. Joel Smith; Dr. Michael Scott.

"Character traits have seen much study in both virtue ethics and in moral psychology. However, character traits are also used as a tool to help us understand others generally in social situations, by attributing them to predict or to explain others' behaviour. E.g. Will she tip well in this restaurant? Yes, she is a generous person. / Why did she tip well in this restaurant? Because she is a generous person. As such, they form part of our 'folk psychology', our set of tools we use to understand others.

The thesis looks to explore how we should understand this capacity, and what relationship it bears to other 'folk psychological' capacities, particularly our ability to attribute mental states to others - to 'mindread'. The thesis draws heavily on both philosophical methodology and empirical material from the cognitive sciences."

Areas of expertise

  • B Philosophy (General)
  • Philosophy of Psychology