A multidimensional assessment of the burden of psoriasis: Results from a multinational dermatologist and patient survey

C E M Griffiths, S J Jo, L Naldi, R Romiti, E Guevara-Sangines, T Howe, G Pietri, I Gilloteau, C Richardson, H Tian, M Augustin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disease, characterised by symptoms that include itching and skin pain and is often associated with comorbidities. Patients have a substantial detriment to quality of life (QoL) and work productivity with associated cost burden.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incremental burden of comorbidities, itch, and affected body areas among systemic eligible patients with psoriasis, using a multinational survey of dermatologists and their psoriasis patients.

METHODS: Multinational data from the Growth from Knowledge (GfK) Disease Atlas global real-world evidence programme were used. Eligible patients were identified as those who were currently having or had ever had moderate-to-severe psoriasis, and must have been receiving prescription treatments at the time of the survey. Multivariable regression analyses were conducted to assess the incremental burden among psoriasis patients with physical and psychological comorbidities, itch, and affected visible and sensitive body areas versus psoriasis patients without these conditions, respectively.

RESULTS: The study enrolled 3,821 psoriasis patients, from 9 countries, with an average Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score of 6.4. The presence of comorbidities was associated with a significant increase in the likelihood of skin pain, lower QoL, greater work impairment and increased usage of medical resources (except in psoriasis patients with obesity and type II diabetes). Psoriasis patients suffering from itch and those with visible and sensitive affected body areas also had impaired QoL versus those without these conditions.

CONCLUSION: Psoriasis patients with physical and psychological comorbidities, itch and, affected visible and sensitive body areas had lower QoL, and greater work impairment compared to those without these conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-181
Number of pages9
JournalThe British journal of dermatology
Volume179
Issue number1
Early online date12 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018

Keywords

  • Journal Article

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