A review of key issues in the measurement of children's social and emotional skills

Michael Wigelsworth, Neil Humphrey, Afroditi Kalambouka, Ann Kalambouka, Ann Lendrum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Recent policy developments (such as the Children's Plan) and the introduction of a new national strategy (the Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning programme) have re-emphasised the importance of social and emotional skills in educational contexts. As such, educational psychologists are increasingly likely to be involved in the measurement of social and emotional skills, either as part of their case-work or through research. They may also be asked to provide advice to schools looking to evaluate certain aspects of their practice in this area. The aim of this paper is to provide a discussion of key issues in the measurement of social and emotional skills in children and adolescents. These include: difficulties with the underlying theory and frameworks for social and emotional skills, inconsistent terminology, the scope and distinctiveness of available measures, psychometric properties, and more practical issues such as the type of respondent, location and purpose of measurement. The paper concludes with a call for more research and the further development of appropriate measures. © 2010 Association of Educational Psychologists.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-186
Number of pages13
JournalEducational Psychology in Practice
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Assessment
  • Children
  • Emotional
  • Measurement
  • Social

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