Acute-phase proteins and the serological evaluation of experimental contact sensitivity in the mouse

I. Kimber, R. K. Ward, C. J. Shepherd, M. N. Smith, K. P W J McAdam, J. G. Raynes

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The evaluation of contact reactions in previously sensitized mice is assessed conventionally by measurement of increases in ear thickness following challenge. In an attempt to develop a serological method for the investigation of contact sensitization in mice, we have examined whether analysis of changes in the concentration of acute-phase proteins in response to challenge provides a reliable alternative means of evaluating elicitation reactions. Measurement of either the relative serum haptoglobin concentration, using radial immunodiffusion, or the absolute concentration of serum amyloid A, by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, has been found to correlate well with induced increases in ear thickness following challenge. Changes in the concentration of acute-phase proteins proved to be of sufficient sensitivity to reflect the specificity of contact sensitization and its inhibition by antigenic competition.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)149-155
    Number of pages6
    JournalInternational Archives of Allergy and Applied Immunology
    Volume89
    Issue number2-3
    Publication statusPublished - 1989

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Acute-phase proteins and the serological evaluation of experimental contact sensitivity in the mouse'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this