Adhesive interactions between cells and biotinylated phospholipid vesicles in alginate: Towards new responsive biomaterials

Felicity De Cogan, Julie E. Gough, Simon J. Webb

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Creating tissue-mimetic biomaterials able to deliver bioactive compounds after receipt of a remote and non-invasive trigger has so far proved to be challenging. The possible applications of such "smart" biomaterials are vast, ranging from subcutaneous drug delivery to tissue engineering. Self-assembled phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) have the ability to deliver both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs, and controlling interactions between functionalized vesicles and cells within biomaterials is an important step for targeted drug delivery to cells. We report an investigation of the interactions between thermallysensitive and biotin-coated dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles and 3T3 fibroblast cells. The stability of these vesicles under physiological conditions was assessed and their interaction with the cell membranes of fibroblasts in media and alginate/fibronectin mixtures was studied. Stable vesicle-cell aggregates were formed in fluid matrices, and could be a model system for improving the delivery of remotely released drugs within vesicle-containing biomaterials. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1045-1051
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Materials Science: Materials in Electronics
    Volume22
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

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