Amylin and the amylin gene: structure, function and relationship to islet amyloid and to diabetes mellitus

Garth J S Cooper, Anthony J. Day, Antony C. Willis, Anne N. Roberts, Kenneth B M Reid, Brendan Leighton

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Amylin [1-3], the major peptide component of the islet amyloid [1] commonly found in the pancreases of patients with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) [4-6], is a recently discovered islet polypeptide. This peptide has many structural and functional features suggesting that it is a novel hormone [1], which may control carbohydrate metabolism in partnership with insulin and other glucoregulatory factors [2,3]. Amylin is synthesised in, and probably secreted from, the ß-cells of the islets of Langerhans [7-12], where it has recently been immunolocalised to secretory granules [13]. DNA cloning studies indicate that in the human and the rat, amylin is generated from a precursor, preproamylin, which displays a typical signal peptide followed by a small prohormone-like sequence containing the amylin sequence [7,14-17]. The presence of the signal peptide suggests that amylin is secreted and plays a physiological role [14,16,17]. Amylin is probably generated by proteolytic processing similar to that for proinsulin and other islet prohormones. The human amylin gene encodes the complete polypeptide pre-. © 1989.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)247-258
    Number of pages11
    JournalBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Cell Research
    Volume1014
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 14 Dec 1989

    Keywords

    • Amylin gene
    • Diabetes mellitus

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