An update on MoonLITE

Robert Gowen, Alan Smith, Berend Winter, Craig Theobald, Kerrin Rees, Andrew J. Ball, Axel Hagermann, Simon Sheridan, Patrick Brown, Tim Oddy, Michele Dougherty, Philip Church, Yang Gao, Adrian Jones, Katherine H. Joy, Ian Crawford, Tom Pike, Sunil Kumar, Toby Hopf, Nigel WellsKevin Green, Keith Ryden

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    MoonLITE is a proposed, UK led lunar science mission involving 4 scientific penetrators that will make in situ measurements at widely separated locations on the Moon. MoonLITE will create the first global lunar network with nodes near and far-side, and in permanently shaded crater(s). With such a network MoonLITE will be able to determine much about the interior of the Moon, including characterisation of its core. Penetrator(s) at the poles will seek and characterise frozen volatiles, possibly of cometary origin and of great importance both to human exploration and to astrobiology. MoonLITE penetrators will reach the Moon at -300 m/s and so must be able to stand the forces associated with this impact. As part of a programme aimed to establish reliable penetrator technologies the first full-scale impact trials have been conducted and are described here.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationInternational Astronautical Federation - 59th International Astronautical Congress 2008, IAC 2008|Int. Astronaut. Fed. - Int. Astronaut. Congr., IAC
    Pages4359-4369
    Number of pages10
    Volume7
    Publication statusPublished - 2008
    Event59th International Astronautical Congress 2008, IAC 2008 - Glasgow
    Duration: 1 Jul 2008 → …
    http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-77950504116&partnerID=40&md5=98b0a54ef04cf26a2e0123e8511dc5e6

    Conference

    Conference59th International Astronautical Congress 2008, IAC 2008
    CityGlasgow
    Period1/07/08 → …
    Internet address

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