Applied crystallography solutions to problems in industrial solid-state chemistry. Case examples with ceramics, cements and zeolites

Paul Barnes, Xaiver Turrillas, Andrew C Jupe, Sally L Colston, David O'Connor, Robert J Cernik, Paul Livesey, Christopher Hall, David Bates, Reginald Dennis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    We show that a no. of processes involved in the field of industrial solid-state chem. can be successfully studied in situ using a range of crystallog. and related techniques. The adaptation of relevant equipment to reproduce the process environment at the sample is a crucial part of the approach. Examples are given, involving the synthesis of zirconia-based ceramics, hydration of cements, and dehydration of zeolites, where successful applications of this approach have uncovered new structural/kinetic aspects concerning seemingly well-established industrial processes. [on SciFinder(R)]
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2187-2196
    Number of pages10
    JournalJ. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans.
    Volume92
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1996

    Keywords

    • Cement
    • Ceramic materials and wares
    • Crystallography (applied crystallog. solns. to problems in industrial solid-state chem., e.g., with ceramic synthesis, cement hydration, and zeolite dehydration)
    • Dehydration
    • Hydration
    • Zeolites Role: PEP (Physical, engineering or chemical process), PRP (Properties), PROC (Process) (applied crystallog. solns. to problems in industrial solid-state chem., e.g., with ceramic synthesis, cement hydration, and zeolite dehydration)
    • crystallog solid state chem
    • ceramic solid state chem crystallog
    • cement hydration solid state chem crystallog
    • zeolite dehydration solid state chem crystallog

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