Autonomic Function Correlates with Microflora Compositions in a Small Cohort of Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Preliminary Clinical Data and Discussion

Daniel Goyal, Fatma Mansab, James Neil, Jaleel Miyan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Research into the effects of microflora on health and in disease has increased recently. Such enthusiasm seems well placed. Should the preliminary studies translate through the larger, more powerful studies, the medical community may well have an entirely new platform from which to intervene for health and against disease.

Methods: Delineating the pathways involved in the microflora and host interaction is likely to yield further avenues for intervention. Here we examine autonomic function and correlate this to compositional stool analysis (via qPCR) in 11 children with autism.

Results: Results show that there is a significant correlation between vagal tone and the proportion of firmicutes in the stools of patients with autism (Spearman’s Ro = 0.782, p = 0.004, n = 11).

Conclusions: These preliminary results suggest there is a direct effect of microflora on neurological function in patients with autism. More powerful studies are required to advance this promising field further.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-1
JournalOBM Neurobiology
Volume3
Issue number2
Early online date28 Jun 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Autism
  • autism spectrum disorder
  • microflora
  • autonomic function
  • vagal tone
  • neurological
  • gut-microbiome-brain
  • neuroinflammation
  • neuropsychiatry
  • firmicutes
  • clostridia

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