Brownfield regeneration and the delivery of sustainable communities in England: what happens to the most deprived neighbourhoods?

Andreas Schulze Baing, Cecilia Wong

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The reuse of previously developed land has been at the heart of successive government regeneration policies in Britain. The strategic regeneration of brownfield land, introduced in the late 1990s in England, is an instrument deployed to achieve multiple objectives, aiming at reducing urban sprawl and greenfield development, as well as contributing to the delivery of the sustainable communities agenda in urban areas. So far there are very few systematic empirical studies to ascertain the actual impact, intended and unintended, brought by this policy. This paper discusses the conceptual and methodological issues involved in measuring the impact of residential development of brownfield land on the most deprived neighbourhoods. It then assesses the cumulative impact of brownfield residential development on housing and neighbourhood change in deprived areas across England over the last 10 years. The policy impacts are examined in terms of these neighbourhoods’ changing housing market conditions, population growth and relative economic deprivation.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventAESOP Annual Conference - Helsinki
Duration: 7 Jul 201010 Jul 2010

Conference

ConferenceAESOP Annual Conference
CityHelsinki
Period7/07/1010/07/10

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