Can Top-Down and Bottom-Up be Reconciled? Electoral Competition and Service Delivery in Malaysia

William Mccourt, Willy McCourt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Top-down versus bottom-up is one of development's enduring tensions, not least in public service delivery. In Malaysia, public services have traditionally been animated from the top down. Bottom-up forces in civil society have strengthened recently, but so too have top-down forces, and their impact on public services is greater.Malaysia's experience suggests that where electoral competition gives politicians an incentive to respond to voters' service preferences, top-down initiatives have the greater potential for large-scale social change. Participatory initiatives will be most effective when they play a supplementary role. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2329-2341
Number of pages12
JournalWorld Development
Volume40
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012

Keywords

  • Civic engagement
  • Democracy
  • Malaysia
  • New Public Management
  • Participation
  • South-East Asia

Research Beacons, Institutes and Platforms

  • Global Development Institute

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