Cationic copolymer-mediated DNA immobilization: Interfacial structure and composition as determined by ellipsometry, dual polarization interferometry, and neutron reflection

XiuBo Zhao, Fang Pan, Paul Coffey, Jian R. Lu

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    DNA immobilization onto support surfaces is required in biotechnological applications such as microarrays and gene delivery. This important interfacial molecular process can be mediated from a preadsobred cationic polymer. There is, however, a lack of understanding over the control of the interfacial composition and structural distribution of the DNA immobilized. We have used a combined approach of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), dual polarization interferometry (DPI) and neutron reflection (NR) to determine the interfacial polymer adsorption and the subsequent DNA binding. Cationic diblock copolymers incorporating 30 phosphorylcholine (PC) groups and different diethylaminoethyl groups, referred to asMPC30-DEAn,were chosen because of their well-defined molecular architecture. While our studies revealed different effects of surface charge and hydrophobicity, the amount of copolymers adsorbed on both model surfaces showed a broad trend of increase with solution pH, indicating a strong effect arising from pH-dependent charge density on the copolymers. In contrast, the copolymer structure and solution concentration showed a weak effect under the conditions studied. The subsequent DNA binding at pH 7 showed that on both surfaces the amount of DNA immobilized followed an approximate 1:1 charge interaction for all different DNA samples studied, irrespective of single or double strand, or different DNA size, indicating the dominant effect of electrostatic interaction between the two species. Both DPI and NR revealed consistent thickness increase upon DNA binding. Furthermore, with increasing DNA size, the interfacial layer became much thicker, and charge interaction drove more extensive interfacial mixing between the two species. Our results show that the amount of DNA immobilized is controlled by the amount of cationic copolymer preadsorbed that is in turn controlled by the solution pH and surface chemistry but that is barely affected by the type and concentration of DNA or cationic copolymer. © 2008 American Chemical Society.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)13556-13564
    Number of pages8
    JournalLangmuir
    Volume24
    Issue number23
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2 Dec 2008

    Keywords

    • DIBLOCK PHOSPHORYLCHOLINE COPOLYMERS
    • TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION
    • GENE DELIVERY
    • ANTISENSE OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDE
    • AIR/WATER INTERFACE
    • AMINE METHACRYLATE
    • CELL TRANSFECTION
    • BLOCK-COPOLYMERS
    • PLASMID DNA
    • ADSORPTION

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