Changes in the stress in the femoral head neck junction after osteochondroplasty for hip impingement: finite element study

Colin Bailey, D Jimenez-Cruz, Parthasarathi Mandal, T Board, Teresa Alonso Rasgado

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) often involves femoral osteochondroplasty. One risk of this procedure is fracture of the femoral neck. We developed a finite element (FE) model to investigate the relationship between depth of resection and femoral neck stress. CT data were used to obtain the geometry of a typical cam-type hip, and a 3D FE model was constructed to predict stress in the head-neck after resection surgery. The model accounted for the forces acting on the head and abductor muscular forces. Bone resection was performed virtually to incremental resection depths. The stresses were calculated for five resection depths and for five different activities (i) standing on one leg (static case); (ii) two-to-one-to-two leg standing; (iii) normal walking; (iv) walking down stairs; and (v) a knee bend. In general, both the average Von Mises stresses and the area of bone that yielded significantly increased at a resection depth of ≥10 mm. The knee bend and walking down stairs demonstrated the highest stresses. The FE model predicts that fracture is likely to occur in the resection area first following removal of a third (10 mm) or more of the diameter of the femoral neck. We suggest that when surgeons perform osteochondroplasty for hip impingement, the depth of resection should be limited to 10 mm.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1999-2006
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Research
    Volume30
    Issue number0
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

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