Comparison of British national newspaper coverage of homicide committed by perpetrators with and without mental illness

Megan Kalucy, Cathryn Rodway, Judith Finn, Anna Pearson, Sandra Flynn, Nicola Swinson, Alison Roscoe, Damian Da Cruz, Louis Appleby, Jenny Shaw

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Objective: Adverse newspaper reporting of mental illness and in particular, violence committed by a mentally ill person, is thought to contribute to stigma. However, violent events are also considered highly newsworthy by journalists. The aim of this study was to compare the likelihood of newspaper reporting for convicted perpetrators of homicide with and without a history of contact with mental health services. Method: A 12 month (April 2000-March 2001) cohort of 577 homicide perpetrators with and without a history of contact with mental health services in England and Wales was examined. These cases were identified by the National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Homicide by People with Mental Illness. By examining 12 national newspapers, we compared the likelihood of reporting homicide perpetrators with and without mental illness. Results: Under half (228 cases, 40%) of the homicide perpetrators were reported in at least one of the study newspapers. Under a fifth (94 cases, 16%) of perpetrators had a history of contact with mental health services and such previous contact did not increase the likelihood of newspaper reporting (odds ratio 1.0 (0.6-1.6)). Conclusions: Previous contact with mental health services did not influence the newsworthiness of a homicide perpetrator. The stigmatizing effect of reporting homicide by perpetrators with mental illness may relate more to the quality of reporting rather than selective over-reporting. © 2011 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)539-548
    Number of pages9
    JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
    Volume45
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

    Keywords

    • Homicide
    • Media
    • Mental illness
    • Newspaper reporting
    • Stigma

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Comparison of British national newspaper coverage of homicide committed by perpetrators with and without mental illness'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this