Concordance of Cornell medical index self-reports to structured clinical assessment for the identification of physical health status

Christine Rogers, Neil Pendleton, John E. Clague, Michael A. Horan, Patrick M A Rabbitt, Maureen Jones, Rachel Coward, Christine Lowe, Lynn McInnes

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Self-reported questionnaires are frequently used to assess health status in epidemiological studies. The Cornell medical index is one such tool used to determine the presence of physical and psychiatric illness but its accuracy and value have been questioned. In this study we have assessed the ability of the CMI to predict health status in two separate patient populations (n=101, 88) by comparison to a structured medical assessment based on the SENIEUR protocol by two physicians. There was good agreement between medication use reported on the CMI and on medical assessment (k=0.79; CI: 0.70-0.88). Accuracy of prediction of the CMI for specific medical conditions was good 89-99%. A threshold score from the CMI was not predictive of health as determined by the SENIEUR protocol. In our older populations, we conclude that the CMI accurately predicted health status. The determination of normal health by a threshold score was poorly predictive of heath status. Self-reported medication use was the best predictor of health status. © 2003 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)261-269
    Number of pages8
    JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
    Volume38
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2004

    Keywords

    • Cornell medical index
    • Geriatric assessment
    • Health status definition

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