Condition Monitoring of Rotating Machines Using Vibration and Bearing Temperature Measurements

Adrian Nembhard, Jyoti Sinha, Andrew Pinkerton, Keri Elbhbah

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Conventional vibration-based condition monitoring (VCM) of rotating machines with a multiple bearing system, such as Turbo-generator (TG) sets, is data intensive. Since a number of sensors are required at each bearing location, the task of diagnosing faults on such systems may be impossible for even an experienced analyst. Hence, the current study aims to develop a simplified fault diagnosis (FD) method that uses just a single vibration and a single temperature sensor on each bearing. Initial trials on an experimental rotating rig indicate that supplementing vibration data with temperature measurements gave improved FD when compared with FD using vibration data alone. Observations made from the initial trials are presented in this paper.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Condition Monitoring of Machinery in Non-Stationary Operations
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the third International Conference on Condition Monitoring of Machinery in Non-Stationary Operations, CMMNO 2013
EditorsGiorgio Dalpiaz, Riccardo Rubini, Gianluca D'Elia
Place of PublicationBerlin Heidelberg
PublisherSpringer Nature
Pages159-169
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9783642393471
Publication statusPublished - 2013
EventThe 3rd International Conference on Condition Monitoring of Machinery in Non-Stationary Operations (CMMNO13) - Ferrara, Italy
Duration: 8 May 201310 May 2013

Conference

ConferenceThe 3rd International Conference on Condition Monitoring of Machinery in Non-Stationary Operations (CMMNO13)
CityFerrara, Italy
Period8/05/1310/05/13

Keywords

  • Vibration Monitoring
  • Condition Monitoring
  • Rotating Machinery
  • Fault Diagnosis
  • Principal Component Analysis

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