Core Fermentation (CoFe) granules focus coordinated glycolytic mRNA localization and translation to fuel glucose fermentation

Fabián Morales Polanco, Christian Bates, Jennifer Lui, Joe Casson, Clara Solari, Mariavittoria Pizzinga, Gabbie Forte, Claire Griffin, Kirsten Garner, Harriet Burt, Hannah Dixon, Simon Hubbard, Paula Portela, Mark Ashe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Glycolysis is a fundamental metabolic pathway for glucose catabolism across biology, and glycolytic enzymes are among the most abundant proteins in cells. Their expression at such levels provides a particular challenge. Here we demonstrate that the glycolytic mRNAs are localized to granules in yeast and human cells. Detailed live cell and smFISH studies in yeast show that the mRNAs are actively translated in granules, and this translation appears critical for the localization. Furthermore, this arrangement is likely to facilitate the higher level organization and control of the glycolytic pathway. Indeed, the degree of fermentation required by cells is intrinsically connected to the extent of mRNA localization to granules. On this basis, we term these granules, core fermentation (CoFe) granules; they appear to represent translation factories, allowing high-level coordinated enzyme synthesis for a critical metabolic pathway.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102069
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournaliScience
Volume24
Issue number2
Early online date19 Jan 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • cell biology
  • molecular biology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Core Fermentation (CoFe) granules focus coordinated glycolytic mRNA localization and translation to fuel glucose fermentation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this