Corrosion Fatigue and Microstructural Characterisation of Type 316 Austenitic Stainless Steels Tested in PWR Primary Water

Kudzanai Mukahiwa, Fabio Scenini, M. Grace Burke, Norman Platts, D. Tice, J Stairmand

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Fatigue crack growth experiments have been performed on high and low sulphur Type 316 austenitic stainless steel specimens in simulated Pressurised Water Reactor primary coolant environments and evaluated via microstructural characterisation techniques to further the understanding of the mechanistic behaviour. At relatively high loading frequencies, the enhanced crack growth for both specimens appeared to be crystallographic and associated with slip localization. However, when the loading frequency was decreased, the crack growth rates for the low S specimen increased, whereas the high S specimen exhibited retarded crack growth and the crack path was no longer crystallographic.
    Highlights
     High sulphur content improves corrosion fatigue crack growth resistance when strain rates are low.
     Crack growth is crystallographic during enhanced crack growth and non-crystallographic during retardation.
     Micro-cleavage cracking occurred after the crack-tip had advanced suggesting that enhanced crack growth was caused by cathodically-produced hydrogen.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)57-70
    Number of pages14
    JournalCorrosion Science
    Volume131
    Early online date26 Oct 2017
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2018

    Keywords

    • Stainless steel
    • Corrosion fatigue
    • Hydrogen embrittlement

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