Could Al-Zahrawi (pre-medieval surgeon) be considered a biomedical engineer

Mohamed N. Saad, Ron S. Leder, Luis Kun, Alexander J. Casson

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

    Abstract

    Abu Al-Qasim Khalaf ibn Abbas Al-Zahrawi, Arab by descent, lived near Cordoba Spain 936 A.D. to 1013 A.D. He was a surgeon/inventor and is considered by many to be the father of modern surgery. He wrote a single volume of thirty treatises on medical/surgical practice called “Al-Tasrif” that served as a reference manual for physicians in Europe during the middle ages. The last treatise which is related to surgery includes 200 illustrations of surgical and medical instruments most of which he invented himself. Al-Zahrawi demonstrates the natural cooperation between biomedical engineers and physicians but in the same person. This special session talk will explore Al-Zahrawi’s contributions and impact on Biomedical Engineering, and the lessons that we can take from his pioneering work.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationhost publication
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2015
    EventEngineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2015 Annual International Conference of the IEEE - Milan
    Duration: 1 Jan 1824 → …

    Conference

    ConferenceEngineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2015 Annual International Conference of the IEEE
    CityMilan
    Period1/01/24 → …

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