Crisis in ‘a normal bad year’: Spaces of humanitarian emergency, the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification scale and the Somali famine of 2011

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

141 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This article takes the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale and its use in the declaration of famine in Somalia in July 2011 as a site for examining how the spatial imaginary and emplaced, affective registers of emergency are implicated in marking situations as spaces of humanitarian emergency, or not. The IPC scale is described and its role in removing the affective registers of crisis discussed in relation to the normalisation of the conditions constituting a classification of IPC Phase 4, 'Humanitarian Emergency', in Somalia. This is contrasted to the urgent mobilisation of humanitarian action following the reclassification of Somalia's food insecurity situation to IPC Phase 5, 'Famine'. It is argued that the IPC phase reclassification, by enacting a moment of rupture, led the normalised space of food insecurity to be seen as a space of humanitarian emergency, thereby triggering the rapid mobilisation of humanitarian action in response to crisis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-47
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironment and Planning A
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • emergency
  • humanitarian space
  • affect
  • food in/security
  • Somalia

Research Beacons, Institutes and Platforms

  • Global Development Institute

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Crisis in ‘a normal bad year’: Spaces of humanitarian emergency, the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification scale and the Somali famine of 2011'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this