Cryogenic performance of a very low noise MMIC Ka-band radiometer front-end

Danielle Kettle, Neil Roddis

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

    Abstract

    Radio telescopes have traditionally used a single receiver at the focus, effectively giving a one-pixel image of the sky. The One Centimetre Receiver Array (OCRA) is a three-stage programme to develop multi-pixel arrays to be mounted at the focus of large radio telescopes. OCRA-f is the second phase, funded under the EU FARADAY project, and consists of a 10-beam array installed on a 32-metre radio telescope in Poland. It will produce Ka-band radio maps of the sky, acting as a ten-pixel radio camera. The paper describes a state-ofthe-art all-MMIC receiver front-end developed using the latticematched indium phosphide foundry process of NGST, California. The effect of leakage on system noise temperature is described. Finally measurements are presented yielding an overall noise temperature of less than 21 kelvin over a 10 GHz bandwidth at Ka band. © 2007 IEEE.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationIEEE MTT-S International Microwave Symposium Digest|IEEE MTT S Int Microwave Symp Dig
    Pages2087-2090
    Number of pages3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007
    Event2007 IEEE MTT-S International Microwave Symposium, IMS 2007 - Honolulu, HI
    Duration: 1 Jul 2007 → …

    Conference

    Conference2007 IEEE MTT-S International Microwave Symposium, IMS 2007
    CityHonolulu, HI
    Period1/07/07 → …

    Keywords

    • Cryogenic
    • InP
    • Ka band
    • MMIC
    • Radiometry

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