Deliberate self-poisoning in adolescence: Why does a brief family intervention work in some cases and not others?

Richard Harrington, Michael Kerfoot, Elizabeth Dyer, Faye McNiven, Julia Gill, Valerie Harrington, Adrine Woodham

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    In a randomized trial of a brief family intervention with adolescents who had deliberately poisoned themselves, we have previously reported that, within the group of patients who did not have major depression, the family intervention was significantly superior to routine care in reducing suicidal thinking. The present paper examined whether efficacy was related to changes in family functioning or other possible mediating variables. Potential mediators included family functioning, hopelessness, depression, adolescent problem-solving and compliance with treatment. The efficacy of the family intervention in reducing suicidal ideation within the nondepressed sub-group was probably not mediated by changes in these variables. The implications of this finding are discussed. (C) 2000 The Association for Professionals in Services for Adolescents.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)13-20
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Adolescence
    Volume23
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2000

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