Development, Feasibility, Impact and Acceptability of a Community Pharmacy-Based Diabetes Care Plan in a Low–Middle-Income Country

Fatima S. Abdulhakeem Ikolaba, Ellen I. Schafheutle, Douglas Steinke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Informed by existing research, mostly from high-income countries, this study aimed to develop and test the feasibility of a community pharmacy person-centred goal-setting intervention for people living with type 2 diabetes in a low–middle-income country—Nigeria. The Medical Research Council (MRC) guidance for developing complex interventions framed the intervention development. Patients participated in monthly community pharmacist consultations over six months. Self-reported and clinical outcome measures were collected at baseline and study completion and analysed in STATA V.14. Twenty pharmacists in 20 pharmacies completed the research and enrolled 104 patients. Of these, 89 patients had complete study data, and 70 patients also completed a post-study evaluation questionnaire. In addition, 15 patients and 10 pharmacists were interviewed. All outcome measures showed statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05). Clinical outcomes (BMI, waist circumference, and fasting plasma glucose) improved significantly. Mean patient activation measure (PAM©), quality of life (EQ-VAS©), and medication adherence improved from baseline to study completion. Eighty-eight per cent of questionnaire respondents were satisfied with the service. Interviews indicated care plan acceptability, patient satisfaction, empowerment, and service enthusiasm. Identified barriers to the consultations included time and technology. This study developed a feasible, effective, well-perceived community pharmacy diabetes care plan in Nigeria.
Original languageEnglish
Article number109
JournalPharmacy
Volume11
Issue number4
Early online date26 Jun 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2023

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