Developmental plasticity of the cardiovascular system in oviparous vertebrates: effects of chronic hypoxia and interactive stressors in the context of climate change

Mitchell Lock, Daniel Ripley, Kerri Smith, Casey A Mueller, Holly Shiels, Dane A Crossley , Gina Galli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Animals at early life stages are generally more sensitive to environmental stress than adults. This is especially true of oviparous vertebrates that develop in variable environments with little or no parental care. These organisms regularly experience environmental fluctuations as part of their natural development, but climate change is increasing the frequency and intensity of these events. The developmental plasticity of oviparous vertebrates will therefore play a critical role in determining their future fitness and survival. In this Review, we discuss and compare the phenotypic consequences of chronic developmental hypoxia on the cardiovascular system of oviparous vertebrates. In particular, we focus on species-specific responses, critical windows, thresholds for responses and the interactive effects of other stressors, such as temperature and hypercapnia. Although important progress has been made, our Review identifies knowledge gaps that need to be addressed if we are to fully understand the impact of climate change on the developmental plasticity of the oviparous vertebrate cardiovascular system.
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Journal of Experimental Biology
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 5 Feb 2024

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