Diet Treatment of Newly Presenting Type 2 Diabetes Improves Insulin Secretory Capacity, but Has No Effect on Insulin Sensitivity

J. P. Hosker, S. Kumar, C. Gordon, D. Bhatnagar, M. France, A. J.M. Boulton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Fifteen newly diagnosed obese Type 2 diabetic subjects were treated with diet alone for 3 months with a median 1.5 kg weight loss. Each had a Continuous Infusion of Glucose with Model Assessment (CIGMA) test, at diagnosis and at 3 months, measuring insulin and C‐peptide responses, and deriving mathematically modelled measures of beta‐cell function and insulin sensitivity. Median fasting glucoses were 9.6 mmol l−1 at diagnosis and 8.5 mmol l−1 at 3 months (NS). Median fasting insulin was 9.3 mU l−1 at diagnosis and 11.7 mU l−1 at 3 months (NS). Median fasting C‐peptide was 0.58 nmol l−1 at diagnosis and 0.64 nmol l−1 at 3 months (p < 0.05). Median achieved plasma insulin increased from 13.8 mU l−1 at diagnosis to 17 mU l−1 at 3 months (p < 0.02); median achieved plasma C‐peptide increased from 0.72 nmol l−1 at diagnosis to 0.81 nmol l−1 at 3 months (p < 0.002). Modelled beta‐cell function rose from median 26 % at diagnosis to 37 % at 3 months (p < 0.02). Modelled insulin sensitivity showed no significant change (median 0.31 at diagnosis, 0.27 at 3 months, NS). Elevation of achieved C‐peptide was positively correlated with weight loss (Rs = 0.53, p < 0.05), but not with change in fasting glucose. Diet treatment of newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes, with modest weight loss, results primarily in improvement of insulin secretory capacity, rather than insulin sensitivity. 1993 Diabetes UK

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)509-513
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1993

Keywords

  • Beta‐cell function
  • Insulin sensitivity
  • Type 2 diabetes

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