Differential effects of mood on information processing: Evidence from the theories of reasoned action and planned behaviour

Christopher J. Armitage, Mark Conner, Paul Norman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The theories of reasoned action and planned behaviour continue to receive considerable research attention, despite criticisms of their 'asocial' conceptualisation and the rational decision-making approach. Two studies were designed to assess the impact of induced mood on condom use (Study 1) and food choice (Study 2). Both studies provided support for application of the theory of reasoned action to health-related behaviour, and for differential effects of mood on information processing. Study 1 provided support for problem-focus theory, with attitudes (but not subjective norm) predicting intention in the negative mood condition. The opposite pattern of findings held for the positive mood condition (i.e. only subjective norm predicted intention). The results of Study 2 provided further support for the problem-focus approach and for the inclusion of self-identity in the theory of planned behaviour. The findings are discussed with implications for future work on mood and behavioural decision making. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)419-433
    Number of pages14
    JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
    Volume29
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 1999

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