Differential effects of UVA1 and UVB radiation on Langerhans cell migration in mice

Malcolm S. Duthie, Ian Kimber, Rebecca J. Dearman, Mary Norval

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The UVB (280-315 nm)- and UVA1 (340-400 nm)-induced migration of Langerhans cells (LC) from the epidermis and accumulation of dendritic cells (DC) in the lymph nodes draining the exposed skin site of C3H/HeN mice have been investigated. One minimum erythemal dose (MED) of UVB (1.5 kJ/m2) and of UVA1 (500 kJ/m2) were chosen, which have been shown previously to suppress delayed hypersensitivity (DTH). UVB irradiation resulted in a reduction in epidermal LC numbers, local to the site of the exposure, which was most apparent 12 h after exposure, but, in contrast, UVA1 had no significant effect even at 72 h after exposure. UVA1 did not exert any protection against the UVB-mediated depletion in LC numbers. The reduction in local LC following UVB exposure was prevented by systemic (intraperitoneal) treatment of mice with neutralising antibodies to either tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or interleukin (IL)-β 2 h prior to the irradiation. It has been reported previously that UVB exposure caused an increase in the number of dendritic cells (DC) in the lymph nodes draining the irradiated skin site. In the present study we have shown that UVA1 had a similar effect. Pretreatment of the mice with neutralising antibodies to IL-1β (by intraperitoneal injection) substantially inhibited DC accumulation induced by both UV regimens. However, anti-TNF-α antibodies affected only the UVB-induced increase, and did not alter the elevation in DC numbers observed following UVA1 exposure. These results indicate that UVB causes the migration of LC from the epidermis and an accumulation of DC in the draining lymph nodes by a mechanism that requires both TNF-α and IL-1β. In contrast, UVA1 does not cause LC migration from the epidermis and the accumulation of DC in the draining lymph nodes observed following UVA1 exposure requires IL-1β, but not TNF-α. It is likely therefore that UVA1 acts through a different mechanism from UVB and may target a cutaneous antigen presenting cell other than LC, such as the dermal DC. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)123-131
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Photochemistry and Photobiology, B: Biology
    Volume57
    Issue number2-3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2000

    Keywords

    • IL-1β
    • Langerhans cells
    • TNF-α
    • UVA1
    • UVB

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