Do Gender and Gender Role Orientation Make a Difference in the Link between Role Demands and Family Interference with Work for Taiwanese Workers?

Luo Lu, Ting-Ting Chang, Shu-Fang Kao, Cary L Cooper

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Abstract

Based on the gender role orientation perspective, this study extends the resource depletion
mechanism that links role demands to family interference with work by testing the moderating effects
of gender and gender role orientation (egalitarian vs. traditional) on the relationships. Analysis of the
data from 251 employees in Taiwan revealed two significant three-way interactive effects. Specifically,
for men, the positive relationship between work demands and family-to-work conflict (FWC) was
stronger for egalitarian than traditional individuals. For women, the positive relationship between
family demands and FWC was stronger for egalitarian than traditional individuals. We also found a
significant two-way interactive effect; that is, within the egalitarian group, the positive relationship
between work demands and FWC was stronger for women than men. Our findings, thus, suggest
both within-gender and between-gender variations in the links between work-to-family demands
and conflict, jointly affected by the individual’s gender and gender role orientation. Contextualized
within the cultural traditions of a Chinese society, we highlight the precarious position that egalitarian
men and women (especially women) find for themselves in fulfilling work duties and family roles.
The theoretical and managerial implications are also discussed.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Sept 2021

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