Does mobilization increase family engagement with early years services? A randomized controlled trial.

Sarah Cotterill, Peter John, Alice Moseley

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

    Abstract

    Research indicates that both doorstep canvassing and postal appeals can be effective in encouraging people to vote although less is known about whether mobilization methods increase engagement with public services. We compare the effect of two different methods of mobilization – doorstep canvassing and leaflets – on family attendance at early years ‘Sure Start’ centres with a sample of 3,444 families. Families were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: a visit from a Sure Start outreach worker providing information and encouragement; a leaflet about Sure Start; a control group that received the usual service. We found no significant difference in Sure Start attendance between the visit group and the control group. Therefore doorstep visits are not an effective way of encouraging families to attend Sure Start. Leaflets by contrast have a moderate effect of 1.8 percentage points.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationhost publication
    Publication statusPublished - 27 Sept 2011
    EventRandomised Controlled Trials in the Social Sciences Conference - York
    Duration: 27 Sept 201128 Sept 2011

    Conference

    ConferenceRandomised Controlled Trials in the Social Sciences Conference
    CityYork
    Period27/09/1128/09/11

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