Dual-Factor Mental Health from Childhood to Early Adolescence and Associated Factors: A Latent Transition Analysis

Kimberly J. Petersen, Neil Humphrey, Pamela Qualter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The dual-factor model of mental health indicates the importance of simultaneously assessing symptoms and subjective wellbeing, but there is limited understanding of how dual-factor mental health changes during the transition from childhood to early adolescence and factors associated with change. The current study investigated dual-factor mental health over a 2-year period from when children were 8–9 years old to 10–11 years old (N = 2402; 48% female), using latent transition analysis. Further analyses determined whether sex and peer support were associated with initial mental health status or specific transitions during this period. Following class enumeration procedures, a 5-class model was selected at both timepoints. Classes were: (1) complete mental health, (2) vulnerable, (3) emotional symptoms but content, (4) conduct problems but content, and (5) troubled. Half of the sample changed mental health status during the study period. Sex and peer support were associated with specific mental health statuses and subsequent transitions. The findings have implications for mental health screening practice and identifying those in need of targeted interventions.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Early online date17 Dec 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Dec 2021

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