Effect of environmental temperature on energy balance and thermogenesis in rats fed normal or low protein diets

N. J. Rothwell, M. J. Stock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Rats fed a low protein (9% metabolizable energy) diet and housed at 24°C gained less weight and body energy than controls fed a normal (25%) protein diet. Energy intake and expenditure corrected for body size [kJ/(kg0.75·d)] were similar in rats fed the two diets, but energetic efficiency was suppressed in low protein-fed rats, and the thermogenic response to norepinephrine and the activity of brown adipose tissue (mitochondrial GDP binding) were both significantly elevated. Housing at a higher temperature (29°C) suppressed energy expenditure and brown fat activity in animals fed either diet, and gross efficiency was greater in control animals at 29°C than at 24°C but unaffected in the protein-deficient group. The differences in brown fat activity between dietary groups were still apparent at 29°C. The results suggest that thermogenesis induced by feeding low protein diets is not markedly inhibited by a higher environmental temperature.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)833-837
Number of pages4
JournalJournal Of Nutrition
Volume117
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1987

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