Efficacy of Guselkumab Compared With Adalimumab and Placebo for Psoriasis in Specific Body Regions: A Secondary Analysis of 2 Randomized Clinical Trials

Peter Foley, Kenneth Gordon, Christopher E M Griffiths, Yasmine Wasfi, Bruce Randazzo, Michael Song, Shu Li, Yaung-Kaung Shen, Andrew Blauvelt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Importance: Psoriasis of the scalp, palms and/or soles, and nails is challenging to treat.

Objective: To evaluate the effect of guselkumab on psoriasis in specific body regions.

Design, Setting, and Participants: VOYAGE 1 and VOYAGE 2 were, double-blind, placebo- and adalimumab-controlled studies of guselkumab conducted at 101 and 115 global sites, respectively, from November 3, 2014, to May 19, 2016. Patients had moderate to severe plaque psoriasis (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score ≥12, Investigator's Global Assessment [IGA] score ≥3, and ≥10% body surface area with psoriasis). This post hoc data analysis was performed from February 10 through November 15, 2017.

Exposures: Patients were randomized to guselkumab, 100 mg (weeks 0 and 4, then every 8 weeks); placebo followed by guselkumab, 100 mg, starting at week 16; or adalimumab (80 mg [week 0] and 40 mg [week 1, then every 2 weeks]).

Main Outcomes and Measures: Efficacy was assessed through week 24. End points included numbers of patients achieving scores of 0 or 1 (clear or near clear) or 0 (clear) on the scalp-specific IGA (ss-IGA), Physician's Global Assessment of the hands and/or feet (hf-PGA), and fingernail PGA (f-PGA) and percentage of improvement in target Nail Psoriasis Severity Index score.

Results: Of 1829 randomized patients (mean [SD] age, 43.6 [12.4] years; 1300 [71.1%] male, 1498 [81.9%] white), 1576 (86.2%) had psoriasis of the scalp; 501 (27.4%), palms and/or soles; and 1049 (57.4%), fingernails. At baseline, 1512 (82.7%), 461 (25.2%), and 928 (50.7%) patients had a score of 2 or higher on the ss-IGA, hf-PGA, and f-PGA, respectively, and were included in the analysis. Guselkumab was superior to placebo based on the proportion of patients achieving an ss-IGA score of 0 or 1 (560 [81.8%] vs 43 [12.4%]) at week 16 and to adalimumab (582 [85.0%] vs 329 [68.5%]) at week 24 (both P < .001); 479 (69.9%) in the guselkumab group vs 270 (56.3%) in the adalimumab group achieved an ss-IGA score of 0 (all P < .001). An hf-PGA score of 0 or 1 was achieved by 154 patients (75.5%) in the guselkumab group vs 15 (14.2%) in the placebo group at week 16 and 164 (80.4%) in the guselkumab group vs 91 (60.3%) in the adalimumab group at week 24; 153 (75.0%) in the guselkumab group vs 76 (50.3%) in the adalimumab group achieved an hf-PGA score of 0 (all P < .001). An f-PGA score of 0 or 1 was achieved by 196 patients (46.7%) in the guselkumab group vs 32 (15.2%) in the placebo group at week 16 (P < .001) and 252 (60.0%) in the guselkumab group vs 191 (64.3%) in the adalimumab group at week 24 (P = .11); 115 (27.4%) in the guselkumab group vs 83 (27.9%) in the adalimumab group achieved an f-PGA score of 0 (P = .63).

Conclusions and Relevance: Compared with adalimumab, guselkumab was associated with significant improvement in psoriasis on the scalp and palms and/or soles; magnitude of improvement in fingernails did not differ between treatments. These results may help dermatologists make treatment decisions for patients with psoriasis in difficult-to-treat body regions.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifiers: NCT02207231 and NCT02207244.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)676-683
Number of pages8
JournalJAMA dermatology
Volume154
Issue number6
Early online date16 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2018

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