End-user development for task management: Survey of attitudes and practices

Nikolay Mehandjiev, Todor Stoitsev, Olaf Grebner, Stefan Scheidl, Uwe Riss

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The willingness of non-programmers to develop or modify their software depends not only on using the right interfaces and programming model but also on users making positive judgment about the balance of benefits and costs such as learning time and errors. This paper reports on a questionnaire-based survey which charts this economic dimension of End-User Development (EUD) within the area of task management. The survey explores the extent of EUD practices, gauges end user's perceptions of EUD risks, benefits and proposed supporting actions, and identifies factors which facilitate EUD practices. © 2008 IEEE.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - 2008 IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing, VL/HCC 2008|Proc. - IEEE Symp. Vis. Lang. Hum.-Cent. Comput., VL/HCC
Place of PublicationIEEE CS Press
Pages166-174
Number of pages8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Event2008 IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing, VL/HCC 2008 - Herrsching am Ammersee
Duration: 1 Jul 2008 → …
http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=4639039&isnumber=4639037

Conference

Conference2008 IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing, VL/HCC 2008
CityHerrsching am Ammersee
Period1/07/08 → …
Internet address

Keywords

  • software cost estimation
  • task analysis
  • end user perception
  • end-user development
  • software cost
  • task management
  • Authorization
  • Collaborative tools
  • Collaborative work
  • Companies
  • Computer interfaces
  • Power generation economics
  • Procurement
  • Programming profession
  • Research and development management
  • Software development management

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