Experimental Techniques against RANS Method in a Fully Developed Turbulent Pipe Flow: Evolution of Experimental and Computational Methods for the Study of Turbulence

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Abstract

Fully developed turbulent flow in a pipe was studied by considering experimental and computational methods. The aim of this work was to build on the legacy of the University of Manchester, which is widely regarded as the birthplace of turbulence due to the pioneering work of the prominent academic Professor Osborne Reynolds (1842–1912), by capturing the evolution of fluid turbulence analysis tools over the last 100 years. A classical experimental apparatus was used to measure the mean velocity field and wall shear stress through four historical techniques: static pressure drop; mean square signals measured from a hot-wire; Preston tube; and Clauser plot. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was used to simulate the pipe flow, utilizing the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) method with different two-equation turbulence models. The performance of each approach was assessed to compare the experimental and computational methods. This comparison revealed that the numerical results produced a close agreement with the experiments. The finding shows that, in some cases, CFD simulations could be used as alternative or complementary methods to experimental techniques for analyzing fully developed turbulent pipe flow.

Original languageEnglish
Article number78
JournalFluids
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Feb 2022

Keywords

  • CFD
  • Experimental fluid mechanics
  • Fully developed pipe flow
  • Turbulence

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