Exploring barriers and enablers to the delivery of Making Every Contact Count brief behavioural interventions in Ireland: a cross-sectional survey study

Oonagh Meade, Maria O'Brien, Chris Noone, Agatha Lawless, Jenny Mcsharry, Helen Deely, Jo Hart, Catherine B. Hayes, Christopher Keyworth, Kim Lavoie, Orla McGowan, Andrew Murphy, Patrick J. Murphy, Orlaith O'Reilly, Molly Byrne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: The public health impact of the Irish Making Every Contact Count (MECC) brief intervention programme is dependent on delivery by healthcare professionals. We aimed to identify enablers and modifiable barriers to MECC intervention delivery to optimise MECC implementation.

Design: Online cross-sectional survey design.

Methods: Healthcare professionals (n=4050) who completed MECC eLearning were invited to complete an online survey based on the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF). Multiple regression analysis identified predictors of MECC delivery (logistic regression to predict delivery or not; linear regression to predict frequency of delivery). Data were visualised using Confidence-Interval Based Estimates of Relevance (CIBER).

Results: Seventy-nine percent of participants (n=283/357) had delivered a MECC intervention. In the multiple logistic regression (Nagelkerke’s R2=.34), the significant enablers of intervention delivery were ‘professional role’ (OR = 1.86 [1.10, 3.15]) and ‘intentions/goals’ (OR = 4.75 [1.97, 11.45]); significant barriers included ‘optimistic beliefs about consequences’ (OR = .41 [.18, .94] and ‘negative emotions’ (OR = .50 [.32, .77]). In the multiple linear regression (R2 = .29), the significant enablers of frequency of MECC delivery were ‘intentions/goals’ (b = 10.16, p = .02) and professional role (b = 6.72, p = .03); the significant barriers were ‘negative emotions’ (b = -4.74, p=.04) and ‘barriers to prioritisation’ (b =-5.00, p=.01). CIBER analyses suggested six predictive domains with substantial room for improvement: ‘intentions and goals’, ‘barriers to prioritisation’, ‘environmental resources’, ‘beliefs about capabilities’, ‘negative emotions’ and ‘skills’.

Conclusion: Implementation interventions to enhance MECC delivery should target intentions and goals, beliefs about capabilities, negative emotions, environmental resources, skills and barriers to prioritisation.

Keywords: Making Every Contact Count, chronic illness prevention, brief, behavioural intervention, smoking, diet, exercise, alcohol and drug use, implementation strategy, eLearning
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Health Psychology
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 30 Jan 2023

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