Exploring service user and family perspectives of a Culturally-adapted Family Intervention (CaFI) for African-Caribbean people with psychosis: A qualitative study

Eve Jensen, Carr Rosie, Amy Degnan, Katherine Berry, Dawn Edge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: In the UK, people of African-Caribbean background have the highest rates of psychosis and greatest inequity in mental health services of all ethnicities. National policies have highlighted the lack of evidence-based psychological interventions for this group. The aim of this study was to examine the acceptability of a novel Culturally adapted Family Intervention (CaFI) for African-Caribbean individuals diagnosed with non-affective psychosis and their relatives. Design: A qualitative design. Methods: Semi-structured interviews conducted with 22 service users and 12 family members following participation in CaFI. The interview topic guide included perceptions of the needs and benefits of CaFI; usefulness, cultural specificity and accessibility of CaFI therapy and supporting materials; content and delivering of CaFI sessions; views and experiences of working with CaFI therapists; and perceived barriers and facilitators to implementation. Results: Deductive framework analysis identified three main themes for service users: perceived benefits, barriers and limitations, and delivery of the therapy. Four themes were identified for family members: perceived benefits, perceptions of therapists, delivery of therapy, and accessibility of therapy content, supporting materials, and cultural appropriateness. Conclusions: CaFI was found to be an acceptable intervention for African-Caribbean service users with psychosis and their relatives. Family interventions considering the needs of ethnic and cultural groups have the potential to improve the mental health care and experiences of service users and their families. Practitioner points: The Culturally adapted Family Intervention (CaFI) was viewed as acceptable to African-Caribbean service users with psychosis and their families. Through adapting interventions to be more culturally sensitive, it is possible to enhance the care of those who typically have poor engagement with mental health services. In-keeping with their ethos of individualized care delivery, mental health services should place more emphasis on being able to offer appropriate, culturally adapted interventions to their service users.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)270-289
Number of pages20
JournalBritish Journal of Clinical Psychology
Volume60
Issue number2
Early online date2 Mar 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2021

Keywords

  • African-Caribbean
  • Black Caribbean
  • acceptability
  • culturally adapted
  • family intervention
  • feasibility trial
  • psychosis
  • qualitative study

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