Exploring the ethical underpinnings of self advocacy support for intellectually disabled adults

Rohhss Chapman, Liz Tilley

    Research output: Working paper

    Abstract

    The ethical underpinnings of self-advocacy support Rohhss Chapman and Liz TilleyIn this article the authors will explore ethical dilemmas at the heart of the support worker role in self-advocacy for people with learning disabilities. Self-advocacy organisations are founded on the principles of autonomy and independence for people with learning disabilities but by necessity require the support of non-disabled ‘employees’. This paper will draw on data from two PhD research projects to examine how support workers and people with learning disabilities negotiate the precarious balance between facilitation and control; and consider the role of power in the self-advocate/supporter relationship. The authors will also reflect on the ethical complexities involved in researching and interpreting the activities of organisations that were established to counter the historic oppression and silencing of learning disabled people. (5000 words)
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Publication series

    NameEthical issues in the history of learning disability work: Revelation and Reconciliation
    PublisherEthics and Social Welfare (Special Issue)

    Keywords

    • relational ethics of care

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