Factors associated with cervical screening coverage: a longitudinal analysis of English general practices from 2013 to 2022

Sean Urwin, Stephanie Gillibrand, Jennifer Davies-Oliveira, Emma Crosbie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background:
Cervical cancer remains an important global public health concern. Understanding the factors contributing to a decline in screening uptake in high-income countries is fundamental to improving screening rates. We aimed to identify general practice and patient characteristics related to cervical screening coverage in England between 2013 to 2022.

Methods:
We analysed a panel of 59271 GP practice-years from 7881 GP practices. We applied correlated random effects regression to examine the association between cervical screening uptake and a rich set of GP practice workforce, size, quality and patient characteristics.

Results:
Our results show a decline in overall screening rates from 2013/14 to 2021/22 from 77% to 72%. We find GP workforce and list size characteristics are strongly related to screening rates. An increase in 1 FTE Nurse per 1000 patients is related to a 1.94 percentage point increase in cervical screening rates. GP practices located in more deprived areas have lower screening rates.

Conclusions:
GP workforce and patient characteristics need to be considered by decision-makers to increase screening rates. The implementation of self-sampling screening methods could help address some of the current barriers to screening, including lack of healthcare staff and facilities.




Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Public Health
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 24 Nov 2023

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