Finding one’s own voice – Balancing the views of the researcher within narrative inquiry when exploring race and teacher identity in an EFL context

Eljee Javier

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    The discussion of native and non-native English speaking teachers is an ongoing debate which addresses the linguistic issues regarding the language user. It is more recent that matters of race and English language teachers have been considered. This paper focuses on the methodological difficulties that the narrative researcher encounters when they share a similar background to their research subject(s). The author discusses the issue of positionality within the research when conducting a narrative approach with two participants who share a similar racial and linguistic background as herself, a Canadian-Filipino native English speaker. The author examines the dynamics of retelling the narratives of the participants when taking into account her own experiences that are mirrored within their stories, and concludes with further implications for narrative reflexivity.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationhost publication
    Place of PublicationFredericton, New Brunswick, Canada
    PublisherCentre for Interdisciplinary Research on Narrative
    Publication statusPublished - 2010
    EventNarrative Matters 2010 – Exploring the narrative landscape: Issues, investigations, and interventions - Centre of Interdisciplinary Research on Narrative
    Duration: 20 May 201022 May 2010

    Conference

    ConferenceNarrative Matters 2010 – Exploring the narrative landscape: Issues, investigations, and interventions
    CityCentre of Interdisciplinary Research on Narrative
    Period20/05/1022/05/10

    Keywords

    • narrative, positionality, English language teaching, teacher identity

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