Finding Safety in Feuding. Nobles’ Responses to Nuremberg’s Rural Security Policy in the Mid-Fifteenth Century

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In recent years, historians have radically shifted our understanding of feuding and ‘robbery’ by nobles in late medieval Germany away from the model of impoverished ‘robber knights’ who plundered wealthy townspeople towards an appreciation of the social and political imperatives which lay behind feuding behaviour. However, there has been no equivalent updating of our understanding of nobles’ responses to the security policies which towns developed in order to combat rural violence. This article shows that, far from being ‘desperados’ bent on revenge (as they have been depicted), nobles who reacted to Nuremberg’s rural security policy in the mid-fifteenth century were pursuing a clear (if aggressive) strategy in order to achieve a ‘security’ of their own in relation to the town’s rural patrols. Disputes between town and nobility over rural security were conflicts of interest rather than a clash of cultures, although the discourse surrounding these disputes was increasingly antagonistic.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11–31
Number of pages21
JournalVirtus. Journal of Nobility Studies
Volume23
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2016

Keywords

  • Medieval History
  • German History
  • Violence
  • Security

Research Beacons, Institutes and Platforms

  • John Rylands Research Institute and Library

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Finding Safety in Feuding. Nobles’ Responses to Nuremberg’s Rural Security Policy in the Mid-Fifteenth Century'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this