Fluorescent cell tracer dye permits real-time assessment of re-epithelialization in a serum-free ex vivo human skin wound assay: Real-time assessment of re-epithelialization

Nur Azida Mohd Nasir, Ralf Paus, David Ansell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Ex vivo wounded human skin organ culture is an invaluable tool for translationally relevant preclinical wound healing research. However, studies incorporating this system are still underutilized within the field because of the low throughput of histological analysis required for downstream assessment. In this study, we use intravital fluorescent dye to lineage trace epidermal cells, demonstrating that wound re‐epithelialization of human ex vivo wounds occurs consistent with an extending shield mechanism of collective migration. Moreover, we also report a relatively simple method to investigate global epithelial closure of explants in culture using daily fluorescent dye treatment and en face imaging. This study is the first to quantify healing of ex vivo wounds in a longitudinal manner, providing global assessments for re‐epithelialization and tissue contraction. We show that this approach can identify alterations to healing with a known healing promoter. This methodological study highlights the utility of human ex vivo wounds in enhancing our understanding of mechanisms of human skin repair and in evaluating novel therapies to improve healing outcome.
Original languageEnglish
JournalWound Repair and Regeneration
Early online date21 Dec 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Research Beacons, Institutes and Platforms

  • Manchester Institute for Collaborative Research on Ageing

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Fluorescent cell tracer dye permits real-time assessment of re-epithelialization in a serum-free ex vivo human skin wound assay: Real-time assessment of re-epithelialization'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this