Gate-Keeping and Localizing in Scientific Translation Publishing: The Case of Richard Taylor and Scientific Memoirs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

180 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Growing interest in studying translation through a sociological lens and the relative lack of attention by translation scholars to the production of scientific translations provide impetus and rationale for this case study. Richard Taylor's editorial work for the Scientific Memoirs periodical is examined, with a particular focus on his conception of the utility of translation in the service of scientific advancement in Britain. The roles of gate-keeper and localizer of scientific material are attributed to Taylor, roles which he exercised through promotion of scientific translation, selection of texts to publish and editorial interventions in translations. The historical case study sheds light on activities of editing, translating and publishing science in mid-nineteenth-century Britain but is also illustrative of research areas where the interests of translation scholars and historians of science may converge. By centring attention on Taylor's editorial role, some of the material and social contingencies of this publishing activity are highlighted, enabling us to gain a deeper appreciation of scientific translation as sociohistorical practice. © 2014 British Society for the History of Science.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)433-450
Number of pages17
JournalBritish Journal for the History of Science
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • translation of science
  • Richard Taylor
  • Scientific Memoirs
  • 19th century
  • localization

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Gate-Keeping and Localizing in Scientific Translation Publishing: The Case of Richard Taylor and Scientific Memoirs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this