Gender Diversity and Work-life Conflict in Changing Times

Luo Lu, Shu-Fang Kao, Ting-Ting Chang, Cary L Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of the study is to contribute to the “well-being, diversity, equity, and inclusion” dialogue of the post-pandemic era. Specifically, we explored the joint effects of biological sex and gender diversity in self-identity on the role demands-work and family conflict relationships. To advance the inclusion of scientific knowledge, the present study was situated in the cultural context of a Chinese society. We conducted survey on a sample of 317 Taiwanese employees. We used structured questionnaires to collect data on biological sex, gender identity (self-endorsement on masculinity and femininity traits), work and family demands, work-to-family conflict (WFC), and family-to-work conflict (FWC). We found two sets of significant 3-way interactions (sex x femininity x role demands) in predicting work and family conflict. Frist, for men, identifying with high femininity traits strengthened the positive relationship between work demands and FWC; for women, identifying with low femininity traits strengthened the same relationship. Second, for men, identifying with high femininity traits strengthened the relationship between family demands and WFC; for women, identifying with low femininity traits strengthened the same relationship. Our findings highlight the importance of jointly examining the biological, psychological, and social aspects of gender on the work and family interface. Contextualizing in an Eastern cultural tradition, we put the spotlight on societal pressure on people of non-traditional gender identities.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Dec 2020

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