GETTING THERE: TRANSFORMING AND INTEGRATING URBAN TRAVEL PROVISION FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

David J. Ling, Stuart Murray

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

    Abstract

    The classic model of public transport provision within urban areas has tended to regard potential users as being in one of two distinct groups: ‘normal people’ with few or no difficulties in using conventional forms of public transport; and ‘disabled people’ who have substantial problems using conventional public transport and for whom specialist door-to-door services are needed. In reality, there is a complex spectrum of potential public transport users, with different and varying levels and types of disability, and with differing and changing travel needs. Never-the-less, this traditional perception of a divide between ‘normal’ and ‘disabled’ users has pervaded the operational and policy-making contexts within which much of urban public transport is provided, at least within Britain.This model has persisted despite more recent technical developments in the design of conventional public transport vehicles and infrastructure that have lifted some of the physical barriers to its use by many, but not all, disabled people. Although developments such as low-floor buses and the adoption of inclusive design principles for infrastructure have made it easier for many people with disabilities to use some parts of the ‘mainstream’ public transport system, other developments in the operation and funding of that system are beginning to create new difficulties in providing public transport access for all.The paper provides a comparative critique of the development and current provision of door-to-door public transport services within a selection of British urban areas. This includes the background and rationale for service development and the current provision of door-to-door services and their use. It contrasts the costs and opportunities of these services with alternatives including upgraded ‘mainstream’ public transport or commercial door-to-door services, such as taxis. This is done using a mixture of meta-analysis and review of existing survey data from a range of urban areas in Britain. Specific case-studies from the Greater Manchester area include outcomes from the EU supported Improving Connectivity and Mobility Access (ICMA) Project and recent work that has been driven by the need to improve service quality and efficiency in respect of the wide range of social needs transport provision which deliver service solutions to those with particular mobility needs across the conurbation.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationhost publication
    Publication statusPublished - Sept 2012
    EventTRANSED 2012: The 13th International Conference on ’Mobility and Transport for Elderly and Disabled Persons’ - New Delhi, India
    Duration: 17 Sept 201221 Oct 2012

    Conference

    ConferenceTRANSED 2012: The 13th International Conference on ’Mobility and Transport for Elderly and Disabled Persons’
    CityNew Delhi, India
    Period17/09/1221/10/12

    Keywords

    • Integration
    • Specialised transport
    • Improving mobility
    • Urban travel

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'GETTING THERE: TRANSFORMING AND INTEGRATING URBAN TRAVEL PROVISION FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this