Graphene: New bridge between condensed matter physics and quantum electrodynamics

M. I. Katsnelson, K. S. Novoselov

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Graphene is the first example of truly two-dimensional crystals-it is just one layer of carbon atoms. It turns out to be a gapless semiconductor with unique electronic properties resulting from the fact that charge carriers in graphene demonstrate charge-conjugation symmetry between electrons and holes and possess an internal degree of freedom similar to "chirality" for ultrarelativistic elementary particles. It provides an unexpected bridge between condensed matter physics and quantum electrodynamics (QED). In particular, the relativistic Zitterbewegung leads to the minimum conductivity of the order of conductance quantum e2 / h in the limit of zero doping; the concept of Klein paradox (tunneling of relativistic particles) provides an essential insight into electron propagation through potential barriers; vacuum polarization around charge impurities is essential for understanding of high electron mobility in graphene; an index theorem explains the anomalous quantum Hall effect. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)3-13
    Number of pages10
    JournalSolid State Communications
    Volume143
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2007

    Keywords

    • A. Graphene
    • D. Electron mobility
    • D. Quantum Hall effect
    • D. Tunneling

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Graphene: New bridge between condensed matter physics and quantum electrodynamics'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this